Thursday Thought: Buying a Hairbrush for spanking

The comments in this post are purely mine and not of any of the sites or links in this post.  This advice is only for purchases of brushes to be used for spanking between consenting adults.

Recently, I had a dear friend have a terrible thing happen.  Her plastic hairbrush was broken after she received a sound bottom warming.  The poor plastic brush just could not keep up with the task.

I hate plastic hair brushes. This might just be me being a snob, but I have seen them break and crack during scenes and discipline. I have also seen them crack and pinch flesh and cause light bleeding.  I also dislike newer wooden brushes where the handle and the back are not one solid piece.

I prefer solid unibody brushes for safety and durability.  There is nothing worse than spanking a bottom and the brush breaking and the paddle portion flying across the room.

The advice I give to most people when buying new brushes is:

1. Feel it:  (Make sure the brush feels solid)  Check the body to make sure the head and the handle are one solid piece.  Also, some brushes have an air cushion under the bristles.  These brushes are often sturdy but light, so when you’re applying it to a backside it will actually sting more than thud.

2. Condition:  If you’re in an antique store and you have found your dream Mason Pearson oval boar bristle hairbrush, some things you want to look for are:  Cracking – make sure the brush is not cracking or splintering.  Some of them may have paint peeling off but you can fix that by using a touch-up pen or other wood treatment that matches the color of the brush.

3. Body:  Just because the brush looks solid does not mean it is. Many brushes look like they’re unibodies and there actually two parts.  These will break.  If the handle is rounded or perfectly round and the head with bristles are flat and oval, chances are the brush is two parts.

Be sure to test your new purchases in the privacy of your own home.  You can find brushes in beauty supply stores as well as online.   I get many of my antiques from e-Bay.

Brands that have my seal of approval are:

Mason Pearson and Earth Therapeutics

If you get an antique brush and need to clean it, I have often found a dip in vinegar will fix any odors that may be on the brush.  Remove all the hair that may be trapped in the bristles. You can even leave the brush in a airtight bag for 7 or so days.  If the wood looks a little dry, just treat with some Murphy Oil Soap and you’re on your way.

No Responses

css.php